Jan 242010
 

Source: “Authentic Happiness,” Martin E. P. Seligman, Ph.D., Chapter 3

We are endowed with access to powerful and insistent emotional states. They arise from the deepest and most primitive areas of our brain. They include more than fight or flight survival instincts to take decisive action to kill or conserve; they include the capacity for happiness. Happiness must serve an important, fundamental purpose.

Negative emotions include fear, sadness, discussed, repulsion, hatred and anger. They are especially important in win-lose situations, where the loser may be oneself. Effective responses to negative emotions affect survival and would reasonably be an important part of natural selection. The likelihood that a person will present predominantly negative or positive emotions it is, in fact strongly affected by genetic inheritance.

Positive feelings encourage us to approach an object or develop a situation. But, negative and positive emotions are much more complex than the stimulus attraction and avoidance processes of bacteria. Until recently, psychologists have generally ignored positive emotions. They were interpreted as secondary effects of situations and behaviors. They are, in fact, as important to our survival behavior as fear.

Dec 292009
 

Lecture: Yale: Paul Bloom: Evolution and Gender

Lecture 14 – Psychology, Sex, and Evolution

This lecture reviews what evolutionary theories and recent studies in psychology can tell us about sex and gender differences.

Students will hear how psychology can help explain many of the differences that exist in whom we find attractive, what we desire in a mate, and sexual orientation.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Lecture 14 – Psychology, Sex, and Evolution

This lecture reviews what evolutionary theories and recent studies in psychology can tell us about sex and gender differences.

Students will hear how psychology can help explain many of the differences that exist in whom we find attractive, what we desire in a mate, and sexual orientation.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Dec 232009
 
Lecture 10 – Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Evolution and Rationality

This lecture introduces students to the study of psychology from an evolutionary perspective, the idea that like the body, natural selection has shaped the development of the human mind.

Prominent arguments for and against the theory of natural selection and its relationship to human psychology are reviewed.

Students will hear several examples of how studying mental phenomenon from an evolutionary perspective can help constrain theories in psychology as well as explain many prevalent human instincts that underlie many of our most basic behaviors and decisions.

Watch it on Academic Earth