May 312012
 

Most of us have heard the phrase “sustainable development” and perhaps a little about United Nations and other initiatives related to sustainable development such as Agenda 21 and the Earth Charter.  Some of our communities are exploring these principals in the hopes of heading off, or at least moderating, future catastrophes.

The concept of organized sustainable development is described by critics as a massive international conspiracy to deprive you of individual and commercial rights. Yep, that’s pretty much how it is. This threat is so outrageous that I thought I would take this opportunity to speak out [with tongue firmly in cheek] in defense of UN-organized and UN-sustainable development.

[Our] people are guaranteed freedom and liberty.  These should not be trampled on, limited, or regulated regardless of consequences to others. We should be allowed to do whatever we want.

All natural resources are given by God to man to own, subdue, and have dominion over (Genesis 1:28).  Further man was given the physical and mental powers to accomplish this. This same scripture instructed him to be fruitful, multiply, and fill the earth – with no mention of limits.

Automobiles, the open road, and cheap gasoline are as quintessentially American as baseball and apple pie. A gas guzzling vehicle is not only larger and safer for its occupants but a public symbol of status and achievement. Free public roads are the right of every citizen. We should all have unlimited choice to live, work, play, shop, commute, and just drive around at will.

Trees are for lumber; just ask the long-missing inhabitants of Easter Island. They left behind mysterious rock statues, but no growing wood. Trees are also for burning; and when trees become scarce, one can always make more children to go out and forage for sticks.

Insecticides and pesticides are good for crops and lawns – to say nothing of bees, frogs, birds, fish, and shallow wells. But, who needs all that buzzing and chirping anyway? And do we really need water? I never drink water anyway ‘cause there’s plenty of beer.

We have lots of coal and it’s cheap, so we should be allowed to use as much of it as we want to generate as much electricity as we want. Never mind acid rain, millions of children with respiratory problems, or atmospheric heat retention from rising carbon dioxide levels.

Besides, I’m okay now and I don’t give a rip about my grandchildren or anybody else either. Speaking of which, I also don’t care about neutering pets, soil erosion, toxic waste, or even famine. Other people have those problems, not me… so far.

©2012, David Satterlee

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Nov 242009
 

AuthorStephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is a practicing clinical psychologist. His original research centers on a psychodynamic process of "tending the living image," particularly in the context of dreamwork. In 1995, Dr. Aizenstat brought the insights of depth psychology and dreamwork to the Earth Charter International Workshop in The Hague, and he continues to participate in this ongoing United Nations project. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for more than 25 years throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Source: DreamTending.com

Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is the founding president of Pacifica Graduate Institute, a private graduate school offering masters and doctoral programs in psychology and mythological studies. He is a licensed Clinical Psychologist, a Marriage and Family Therapist, and a credentialed public school teacher. He received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fielding Institute in 1982, and his Master of Education from the University of California in 1975.

Dr. Aizensat’s areas of emphasis include depth psychology, dream research, and imaginal and archetypal psychology.

His original research centers on a psychodynamic process of “tending the living image,” particularly in the context of dreamwork. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for more than 25 years throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. His organizational and educational consulting clients have included Systemetrics of McGraw Hill Inc., the New York Open Center, Santa Barbara Mental Health Services, Santa Barbara Middle School, and various other corporations, social service agencies, and school systems.

Dr. Aizenstat has recorded “DreamTending,” a six-cassette series of audiotapes released by Sounds True. His other publications include: “Dreams are Alive” in Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field, edited by D. Slattery and L. Corbett, and “Nature Dreaming: Jungian Psychology and the World Unconscious” in T. Roszak, M.Gomes, and A. Kanner (Eds.) Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind.

In 1995 Dr. Aizenstat participated in the United Nations’ Earth Charter International Workshop at The Hague. He brought the insights of depth psychology and dreamwork to discussions on the formulation of an Earth Charter. The objective of the Earth Charter Project is to propose fundamental principles of a global partnership for sustainable development. Dr. Aizenstat is still actively involved.

Stephen Aizenstat is also deeply involved in Santa Barbara community life. Since 1995 he has offered “DreamTending: Feeding the Soul,” an annual benefit lecture on behalf of the Food Bank of Santa Barbara County. He is an active supporter of the locally based “Heal the Ocean” organization. In November 2002, he was the “local luminary” speaker at the popular “Mind and Supermind” lecture series sponsored by Santa Barbara Community College.