Jul 112012
 

Psychologist Jonathan Haidt recently published research that has been taken to indicate that conservatives hold six key values while liberals hold only three. Naturally, some commentators have had a great time with this one. Haidt followed this up with a new book: “The Righteous Mind.”

This was all based on the results of a “Moral Foundations questionnaire” completed by 2,212 participants. In the end, both liberals and conservatives are seen to relate positively to the concepts of Fairness, Liberty and Caring for the weak.

This is all good and commendable, as far as it goes. However, I made a point of finding and viewing all of the Republican primary debates and heard something else. I was left with serious doubts about the consequences of many proposed policies… and the callous audience reactions to them. The virtues of Fairness and Caring for the weak seemed to be missing in action. Individual Liberties received a lot of emphasis but issues of civil Liberties were neglected. The overall take-away seemed to be: “If the weak can’t take care of themselves then that’s their own misfortune.”

In Haidt’s research, conservatives related positively to three additional values more than liberals did: Sanctity, Loyalty, and Respect for authority. However, nobody seemed to notice that all three relate to those things needed to bind tribes, religions, and authoritarian governments together in the face of a common enemy.

Liberals have characteristically moved beyond “because tradition or our leader says so” as guidance for thought. Liberals want to be personally convinced, rather than bow to superior force or status. Although this independent streak can make them awkward and unruly members of a team or bureaucracy, it makes them ideally suited for participatory Democracy.

It need not be a bad thing to leave some values and virtues behind. For instance, you just don’t hear anybody recommending “fealty” anymore. Fealty is the submission that a member of a lower social class owes to his master or king. Vows of chastity, obedience, poverty and silence are not so popular anymore either. Neither is the penance of self-flagellation or the piety of sacrificing children by fire.

If you have been following my earlier discussion of developmental stages, you can see why most liberals are able to look at these “missing” values and say, “been there, done that, moved on, but still have friends that…”

Finally, others, such as Integral Theorist Jeff Salzman, have pointed out that Haidt’s research simply omitted some values that are part of the “language of liberalism” that many conservatives have yet to fully embrace. These three additional values are Empathy, Pluralism, and Social Justice.

My point is this: Please think critically the next time someone tells you that another group doesn’t have values just because their values are not exactly the same as his.

© 2012, David Satterlee

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Jan 152010
 

Source: “Authentic Happiness,” Martin E. P. Seligman, Ph.D., Chapter 2

APA

Martin Seligman was elected president of the American Psychological Association (APA) for 1998.

Veterans Administration Act of 1946

The Veterans Administration Act of 1946 was created for the practical purpose of helping returning veterans of World War II. This shifted the emphasis of the field from academic research on learning, behavior, and motivation toward more practical applications. At that time, “no mental illness was treatable. For not a single disorder did any treatment work better than no treatment at all.”

NIMH

The National Institute Of Mental Health was created in 1947, and focused on the interests of its many psychiatrists, primarily psychiatric pathology. But

Learned helplessness

In 1968, Martin Seligman worked on “learned helplessness.” His findings “challenged the central axioms of my field.” He determined that learned helplessness closely resembled “unipolar depression” in both observable characteristics and brain chemistry.

Pessimists

Pessimists tend to believe that their problems are “permanent, pervasive, and personal. Pessimists are more likely to become depressed when they meet with problems. They perform more poorly at their jobs, have more health problems, and shorter lives.

Optimists

Optimist tend to believe that their problems are “surmountable, articulate to a single problem, and resulting from temporary circumstances or other people.”

Nikki story

Martin Seligman tells the story of an important realization triggered by his five-year-old daughter, Nikki. While weeding in his garden, he yelled at Nikki for disturbing him. She responded: “Daddy, do you remember before my fifth birthday? From when I was three until when I was five, I was a whiner. I whined every day. On my fifth birthday, I decided I wasn’t going to whine anymore. That was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. And if I can stop whining, you can stop being such a grouch.”

Jan 012010
 
Lecture 16 – A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part I

This is the first of two lectures on social psychology, the study of how we think about ourselves, other people, and social groups.

Students will hear about the famous "six degrees of separation" phenomenon and how it illuminates important individual differences in social connectedness.

This lecture also reviews a number of important biases that greatly influence how we think of ourselves as well as other people.

Watch it on Academic Earth

 

Lecture 17 – A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part II

This lecture begins with the second half of the discussion on social psychology.

Students will learn about several important factors influencing how we form impressions of others, including our ability to form rapid impressions about people.

This discussion focuses heavily upon stereotypes, including a discussion of their utility, reliability, and the negative effects that even implicit stereotypes can incur.

The second half of the lecture introduces students to two prominent mysteries in the field of psychology.

First, students will learn what is known and unknown about sleep, including why we sleep, the different types of sleep, disorders, and of course, dreams, what they are about and why we have them.

Second, this half reviews how laughter remains a mysterious and interesting psychological phenomenon.

Students will hear theories that attempt to explain what causes us to laugh and why, with a particular emphasis on current evolutionary theory.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Dec 042009
 
Making a Life, Making a Living: Reclaiming Your Purpose and Passion in Business and in Life

Source: Amazon.com

Albion, who gave up a teaching post at Harvard Business School and now publishes a monthly newsletter called "Making a Life," has spent the last 11 years preaching that personal integrity is the real ticket to prosperity.

He cites a study that tracked the careers of 1500 business school graduates. In 1960, the year they graduated, all but 255 said they wanted to make money first in order to do what they really wanted later on; the remainder decided to do what they loved in hopes that money would follow. Of the 101 who became millionaires by 1980, only one belonged to the former group.

In chapters with titles such as "Don’t Let Success Stand in the Way of Opportunity," "Bring Your Values to Work" and "Live a Life, Not a Resume," Albion profiles a range of entrepreneurs and high-level employees. His emphasis is on the disparate paths these people took to achieve a sense of purpose and meaning in work that carried over into their personal lives.

There’s Elliot Hoffman, who built the San Francisco-based cafe Just Desserts from a single birthday cake into one of the city’s most profitable and socially responsible businesses. And there’s Albion’s most personal story, that of his mother, which frames the entire book. In 1986, she was diagnosed with cancer, and her doctor indicated she would be lucky to live six months. Now in her 70s, she continues to head the successful manufacturing company she began in 1978.

Albion’s book powerfully illustrates what can be accomplished when, in our work lives, we use our heads while following our hearts. (Jan.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc

Nov 282009
 

Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

Thom Gehring, PhD, contributes to Integral Correctional Education Studies at Integral Institute and is a Co-Director of a Correctional Education Association Special Interest Group. He has been a correctional educator since 1972, in New Jersey, Virginia, New York, California, and worked in other systems as a consultant.

Source: CSUSB.edu Faculty & Staffimage 

Director of the Center, Thom Gehring’s scholarly emphasis is on the history of correctional education and prison reform. He has been a correctional educator since 1972. Thom did his Ph.D. dissertation on the correctional school district pattern of organization. He serves as the historian for the Correctional Education Association. Thom is a professor of education who directs the EDCA correctional and alternative masters degree program.

 

 
  • Hardcover: 107 pages
  • Publisher: California State University San Bernardino (January 2007)
  •  
  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: California State University San Bernardino (January 2007)
  •  
  • Hardcover: 281 pages
  • Publisher: California State University San Bernardino (December 2008)
  •  
  • Paperback: 317 pages
  • Publisher: California State University San Bernardino; 1st edition (January 2006)
  •  
  • Unknown Binding: 200 pages
  • Publisher: The Authority (1979)
  • Out of Print–Limited Availability.
  • See also: Correctional Education Publication Series

    Nov 242009
     

    AuthorStephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is a practicing clinical psychologist. His original research centers on a psychodynamic process of "tending the living image," particularly in the context of dreamwork. In 1995, Dr. Aizenstat brought the insights of depth psychology and dreamwork to the Earth Charter International Workshop in The Hague, and he continues to participate in this ongoing United Nations project. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for more than 25 years throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia.

    Source: DreamTending.com

    Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is the founding president of Pacifica Graduate Institute, a private graduate school offering masters and doctoral programs in psychology and mythological studies. He is a licensed Clinical Psychologist, a Marriage and Family Therapist, and a credentialed public school teacher. He received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fielding Institute in 1982, and his Master of Education from the University of California in 1975.

    Dr. Aizensat’s areas of emphasis include depth psychology, dream research, and imaginal and archetypal psychology.

    His original research centers on a psychodynamic process of “tending the living image,” particularly in the context of dreamwork. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for more than 25 years throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. His organizational and educational consulting clients have included Systemetrics of McGraw Hill Inc., the New York Open Center, Santa Barbara Mental Health Services, Santa Barbara Middle School, and various other corporations, social service agencies, and school systems.

    Dr. Aizenstat has recorded “DreamTending,” a six-cassette series of audiotapes released by Sounds True. His other publications include: “Dreams are Alive” in Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field, edited by D. Slattery and L. Corbett, and “Nature Dreaming: Jungian Psychology and the World Unconscious” in T. Roszak, M.Gomes, and A. Kanner (Eds.) Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind.

    In 1995 Dr. Aizenstat participated in the United Nations’ Earth Charter International Workshop at The Hague. He brought the insights of depth psychology and dreamwork to discussions on the formulation of an Earth Charter. The objective of the Earth Charter Project is to propose fundamental principles of a global partnership for sustainable development. Dr. Aizenstat is still actively involved.

    Stephen Aizenstat is also deeply involved in Santa Barbara community life. Since 1995 he has offered “DreamTending: Feeding the Soul,” an annual benefit lecture on behalf of the Food Bank of Santa Barbara County. He is an active supporter of the locally based “Heal the Ocean” organization. In November 2002, he was the “local luminary” speaker at the popular “Mind and Supermind” lecture series sponsored by Santa Barbara Community College.