Jul 112012
 

Psychologist Jonathan Haidt recently published research that has been taken to indicate that conservatives hold six key values while liberals hold only three. Naturally, some commentators have had a great time with this one. Haidt followed this up with a new book: “The Righteous Mind.”

This was all based on the results of a “Moral Foundations questionnaire” completed by 2,212 participants. In the end, both liberals and conservatives are seen to relate positively to the concepts of Fairness, Liberty and Caring for the weak.

This is all good and commendable, as far as it goes. However, I made a point of finding and viewing all of the Republican primary debates and heard something else. I was left with serious doubts about the consequences of many proposed policies… and the callous audience reactions to them. The virtues of Fairness and Caring for the weak seemed to be missing in action. Individual Liberties received a lot of emphasis but issues of civil Liberties were neglected. The overall take-away seemed to be: “If the weak can’t take care of themselves then that’s their own misfortune.”

In Haidt’s research, conservatives related positively to three additional values more than liberals did: Sanctity, Loyalty, and Respect for authority. However, nobody seemed to notice that all three relate to those things needed to bind tribes, religions, and authoritarian governments together in the face of a common enemy.

Liberals have characteristically moved beyond “because tradition or our leader says so” as guidance for thought. Liberals want to be personally convinced, rather than bow to superior force or status. Although this independent streak can make them awkward and unruly members of a team or bureaucracy, it makes them ideally suited for participatory Democracy.

It need not be a bad thing to leave some values and virtues behind. For instance, you just don’t hear anybody recommending “fealty” anymore. Fealty is the submission that a member of a lower social class owes to his master or king. Vows of chastity, obedience, poverty and silence are not so popular anymore either. Neither is the penance of self-flagellation or the piety of sacrificing children by fire.

If you have been following my earlier discussion of developmental stages, you can see why most liberals are able to look at these “missing” values and say, “been there, done that, moved on, but still have friends that…”

Finally, others, such as Integral Theorist Jeff Salzman, have pointed out that Haidt’s research simply omitted some values that are part of the “language of liberalism” that many conservatives have yet to fully embrace. These three additional values are Empathy, Pluralism, and Social Justice.

My point is this: Please think critically the next time someone tells you that another group doesn’t have values just because their values are not exactly the same as his.

© 2012, David Satterlee

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Feb 052010
 

Source: “Authentic Happiness,” Martin E. P. Seligman, Ph.D., Chapter 6

Satisfaction with Life Scale

Are most people happy?

A large majority of people in the United States report themselves as being happy. This result is common to most populations around the world. Oddly, most people see themselves as happier than others especially the popular, powerful and educated.

Why be happy?

Happy people are healthier, live longer, work more productively and have higher incomes, are more tolerant, more creative, and make decisions more easily, select challenging goals, are more persistent, have greater empathy, more friends, and better marriages. Much of this reflects an improved ability to function in social situations. But

“There is no duty we sell underrate as the duty of being happy. By being happy we sow anonymous benefits upon the world.” Robert Louis Stevenson

Who is happy?

Men and women report roughly equal levels of happiness and satisfaction. The same equality holds true across the age spectrum. Factors including formal education, IQ, and race also fail to affect happiness. Married people report more happiness than single who, in turn report more happiness than divorced or separated. Spiritual practice tends to increase happiness and tend to experience fewer negative life circumstances. It seems important that basic needs be met, but material abundance above those basic needs does not increase happiness.

“The happiest people all seem to have good friends.” Psychologist Ed Diener

The happiest people tend to be highly social, and spend the most time in the company of others. They tend to be extroverts and have the desire and ability to build strong social relationships. In one study, conscientiousness, with goal setting, personal control, and purposeful achievement, strongly correlated with life satisfaction. Happy people tend to experience high intrinsic self-esteem; they’re optimistic about themselves and their circumstances.

Pursuing Happiness
  • Do not interpret material achievement as happiness and success in life.
  • Compare yourself, and set your expectations, relative to those who have less.
  • Keep a gratitude journal and review it to remember the things you appreciate.
  • Discover the activities that allow you to experience a sense of flow and learn to reproduce those circumstances.
  • Commit to your goals, finish what you start, and experience your effort with quiet mindfulness.
  • Have and enjoy the hobby. Prefer engagement with life too sedentary activities.
  • Build and maintain satisfying family and social relationships.
  • Volunteer your attention, creativity, and efforts in service to others.
  • Sustain a satisfying spiritual practice that builds hope.
    Dec 012009
     

    Source: Integral+Life

    image Elliott Ingersoll is a Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Counseling, Administration, Supervision, and Adult Learning at Cleveland State University. He is licensed as a Professional Clinical Counselor and a psychologist in the state of Ohio.

    Elliott Ingersoll is a Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Counseling, Administration, Supervision, and Adult Learning at Cleveland State University. He is licensed as a Professional Clinical Counselor and a psychologist in the state of Ohio.

    Elliott has authored and co-authored four books, and two dozen articles and book chapters on topics ranging from Integral Theory to its infusion in counseling, spirituality, psychopharmacology, and diagnosis. Most recently, Elliott co-authored Psychopharmacology for Helping Professionals: An Integral Exploration (2005). He lives in Kent, Ohio with his wife Jennifer, son Brady, and newborn daughter Kaitlyn.

    Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

    Elliott Ingersoll’s books and journal publications focus on psychopharmacology, mental health treatment, and the role of spirituality in counseling and psychotherapy.

    See also: www.elliottingersoll.com/ and elliottingersoll.gaia.com/ 

     

      This book provides a basic foundation that readers can use to draw practical and personal conclusions regarding the interface of counseling and spirituality. Readers will have a unique opportunity for both didactic and experiential investigation of spiritual and religious beliefs in relation to the counseling process. The authors provide important information on issues and concepts regarding spirituality, as well as examples of specific interventions related to the topics. The authors have made a conscious attempt to provide readers with information not addressed in other counseling and spirituality texts. The text is divided into three domains, the philosophical, the practical, and the personal. It is the authors’ premise that a holistic model of counseling and spirituality that integrates the scholarly and philosophical with the practical and personal must be used. This book provides a rich introduction to the topics, drawing on various disciplines, and presents the information in a user-friendly manner.
      “A wide range of practice-based topics are addressed in this fact-packed reference book for mental health professionals. Divided into nine major sections, it covers both practical and ethical concerns. The first section focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of common mental illnesses through the life cycle and includes issues relating to specific groups, crisis interventions, and practice management concerns. This is followed by discussions of legal/ethical issues and how mental health workers can cope with the formidable demands and stresses (e.g., compassion fatigue and burnout) of their occupations. The chapters are succinct, typically including statistics, current research, statements of the "best practice," and notable bibliographies. The editors, both professors of counseling at Cleveland State University, have done an admirable job of assembling into a coherent whole contributions from more than 70 experts from a variety of fields. The result is a wealth of useful information handily packaged for the working professional. The practical, direct, and authoritative tone of the book makes it suitable for a diverse audience needing a bridge between the divergent worlds of practice and multidisciplinary research in the field. Recommended for specialized collections serving mental healthcare providers.”
    —Antoinette Brinkman, MLS, Evansville, IN (Library Journal, December 2001)
      Master the basics of psychopharmacology with PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY FOR HELPING PROFESSIONALS! Concise yet comprehensive, this counseling text covers the basic principles of psychopharmacology, commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs for adults, and psychotropic medications prescribed to children. Through the use of numerous case examples, study questions, bolded key terms, and glossary, understanding and applying the material has never been easier. Practical information about how to talk with clients about medication and compliance as well as hands-on information about how to approach collaboration with prescribing professionals prepares you to apply what you have learned to practice.
      This practical book offers valuable information, suggestions, and guidelines designed to help readers learn how to work effectively in an agency setting. The unifying theme and framework is the value and importance of looking at personal and professional aspects of agency counseling. This text helps the reader look inside themselves as well as outside of themselves at their agency.
    Nov 252009
     

    image Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

    Vipassana Esbjörn-Hargens, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and founder of The Center for Integral Human Being. She is a founding member of Integral Institute and is a pioneer in using the psychograph to support transformative work with clients. She has been a serious meditation practitioner for over 20 years.

    Source: The Center for Integral Human Being

    Vipassana Esbjörn-Hargens, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist (PSY 20879) in Sebastopol, CA and the founder of The Center for Integral Human Being. Currently in private practice, her clinical work is largely informed by contemporary psychoanalysis and Integral Theory as well as by her longtime spiritual practice. Vipassana spent a decade immersed in the field of death and dying and hospice work, and she has served as adjunct faculty at various graduate schools in the San Francisco, Bay Area.

    Vipassana received her Ph.D. from the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology and her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Her articles have appeared in the Humanistic Psychologist and Somatics Journal. She is a contributor to the book, Radical Spirit and co-editor for Ken Wilber’s book, The Simple Feeling of Being. She has developed the Integral Psychograph Assessment™.

    Vipassana lives in Sebastopol with her husband and their daughter.

    Nov 242009
     

    AuthorStephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is a practicing clinical psychologist. His original research centers on a psychodynamic process of "tending the living image," particularly in the context of dreamwork. In 1995, Dr. Aizenstat brought the insights of depth psychology and dreamwork to the Earth Charter International Workshop in The Hague, and he continues to participate in this ongoing United Nations project. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for more than 25 years throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia.

    Source: DreamTending.com

    Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is the founding president of Pacifica Graduate Institute, a private graduate school offering masters and doctoral programs in psychology and mythological studies. He is a licensed Clinical Psychologist, a Marriage and Family Therapist, and a credentialed public school teacher. He received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fielding Institute in 1982, and his Master of Education from the University of California in 1975.

    Dr. Aizensat’s areas of emphasis include depth psychology, dream research, and imaginal and archetypal psychology.

    His original research centers on a psychodynamic process of “tending the living image,” particularly in the context of dreamwork. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for more than 25 years throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. His organizational and educational consulting clients have included Systemetrics of McGraw Hill Inc., the New York Open Center, Santa Barbara Mental Health Services, Santa Barbara Middle School, and various other corporations, social service agencies, and school systems.

    Dr. Aizenstat has recorded “DreamTending,” a six-cassette series of audiotapes released by Sounds True. His other publications include: “Dreams are Alive” in Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field, edited by D. Slattery and L. Corbett, and “Nature Dreaming: Jungian Psychology and the World Unconscious” in T. Roszak, M.Gomes, and A. Kanner (Eds.) Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind.

    In 1995 Dr. Aizenstat participated in the United Nations’ Earth Charter International Workshop at The Hague. He brought the insights of depth psychology and dreamwork to discussions on the formulation of an Earth Charter. The objective of the Earth Charter Project is to propose fundamental principles of a global partnership for sustainable development. Dr. Aizenstat is still actively involved.

    Stephen Aizenstat is also deeply involved in Santa Barbara community life. Since 1995 he has offered “DreamTending: Feeding the Soul,” an annual benefit lecture on behalf of the Food Bank of Santa Barbara County. He is an active supporter of the locally based “Heal the Ocean” organization. In November 2002, he was the “local luminary” speaker at the popular “Mind and Supermind” lecture series sponsored by Santa Barbara Community College.