Feb 082012
 

Source: Back to Work: Why We Need Smart Government for a Strong Economy by Bill Clinton
Abstracted from pages 120, 121

First at, we have to get money flowing. Recessions created by financial crashes usually take longer to get over, five to ten years or more, than business-cycle recessions, because banks are reluctant to lend, businesses are reluctant to borrow, corporations are reluctant to hire, and consumers are reluctant to spend.

The good news is that we know where the money is in our distressed economy. And there’s lots of it. Banks have more than $2 trillion in cash reserves uncommitted to loans. And businesses of all sizes have about that much uncommitted to investment.

Since banks can lend, conservatively, $10 for every dollar they have in reserves, U.S. banks have the capacity, in theory, to end the entire global recession. Companies could invest their cash in new products that would increase hiring today or in research and development that would increase employment today and even more in the future.

Unfortunately, banks are reluctant to lend, and loan demand is weak. As for the big companies, many executives have decided, at least for now, not to invest in future growth but to buy back their stock instead, increasing earnings per share and, in the process, earning bigger bonuses for top management, once again widening the gap between themselves and their own employees and doing nothing to put American back to work.

[amz-related-products search_index=’Books’ keywords=’banks recession’ unit=’grid’]

Feb 272011
 

Religion, Science, and Truth

by David Satterlee

Both religion and science build theoretical models to explain observations. Sometimes the models work, sometimes they don’t. Sometimes sacrificing infants to Baal brings productive crops, sometimes bleeding a patient breaks a fever. Most cultures have rejected both of these discredited concepts (religious and scientific, respectively) while even science often fails to distinguish between correlation and cause.

Even having a thoroughly-consistent theory does not establish truth. Traditional Chinese Medicine successfully treats “spleen deficiency” for problems totally unrelated to our anatomical spleen’s function. Both religious and secular authorities have found themselves needing to adjust their accepted doctrine from time to time. Most religions hold a very tenuous claim to truth by faith when you consider that current beliefs (like language, culinary tastes, and DNA) can usually be traced to the intersecting influences of earlier cultures and societies. Continue reading »

Dec 112010
 

Quoted (with minor edits) from: " Spiral Dynamics and the Palestinian-Israel Conflict" and interview between Jeff Salzman and Don Beck. 1 of 4 in integral Profiles: Don Beck. Ref: http://integrallife.com/node/47929

"A healthy blue culture addresses the problems created by red. Each of the systems depends on the others. You have to think within the flow of the systems. There is read egocentric, lack of impulse control, lack of focus, lack of moral compass, then we know it produces a place like Afghanistan and some of our inner cities.

"In Palestine we studied what is next for red. A Palestinian red-purple is not going to be able to form a stable separate state. So, one of our purposes was to elevate a version of blue:" sacrifice self now to obtain later."

Continue reading »

Sep 242010
 


The Theory of “Completed Staff Work”

Completed staff work is the study of a problem and indicates the presentation of a solution, with alternatives, to the manager, so that all that remains to be done on the part of the manager is to indicate approval or disapproval of the completed action. The words "completed action" are emphasized because the more difficult the problem is, the more the tendency is to present the problem and recommended action to the manager in piecemeal fashion. It is your duty as a staff member to work out details.

Continue reading »

Jan 012010
 
Lecture 16 – A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part I

This is the first of two lectures on social psychology, the study of how we think about ourselves, other people, and social groups.

Students will hear about the famous "six degrees of separation" phenomenon and how it illuminates important individual differences in social connectedness.

This lecture also reviews a number of important biases that greatly influence how we think of ourselves as well as other people.

Watch it on Academic Earth

 

Lecture 17 – A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part II

This lecture begins with the second half of the discussion on social psychology.

Students will learn about several important factors influencing how we form impressions of others, including our ability to form rapid impressions about people.

This discussion focuses heavily upon stereotypes, including a discussion of their utility, reliability, and the negative effects that even implicit stereotypes can incur.

The second half of the lecture introduces students to two prominent mysteries in the field of psychology.

First, students will learn what is known and unknown about sleep, including why we sleep, the different types of sleep, disorders, and of course, dreams, what they are about and why we have them.

Second, this half reviews how laughter remains a mysterious and interesting psychological phenomenon.

Students will hear theories that attempt to explain what causes us to laugh and why, with a particular emphasis on current evolutionary theory.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Dec 232009
 
Lecture 10 – Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Evolution and Rationality

This lecture introduces students to the study of psychology from an evolutionary perspective, the idea that like the body, natural selection has shaped the development of the human mind.

Prominent arguments for and against the theory of natural selection and its relationship to human psychology are reviewed.

Students will hear several examples of how studying mental phenomenon from an evolutionary perspective can help constrain theories in psychology as well as explain many prevalent human instincts that underlie many of our most basic behaviors and decisions.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Dec 152009
 
Lecture 4 – Foundations: Skinner

Professor Bloom opens with a brief discussion of the value and evolutionary basis of unconscious processing. The rest of this lecture introduces students to the theory of Behaviorism, particularly the work of prominent behaviorist, B. F. Skinner. Different types of learning are discussed in detail, as well as reasons why behaviorism has been largely displaced as an adequate theory of human mental life.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Dec 112009
 
Lecture 2 – Foundations: This is Your Brain

This lecture introduces students to two broad theories of how the mind relates to the body.

Dualism is the ubiquitous and intuitive feeling that our conscious mind is separate from our physical bodies, whereas

Materialism is the idea that all of our mental states are caused by physical states of the brain.

This lecture reviews arguments explaining why materialism has become the predominant theory of mind in psychology.

This discussion is followed by a basic overview of the neurophysiology of the brain.

Watch it on Academic Earth

Dec 032009
 

Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

Beth J. Jowdy is currently an Assistant Professor in the Sport Management Department at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, New Hampshire. Her areas of academic concentration include experiential learning, reflection, and Integral Theory with a special interest in grassroots event management.

Source: Southern New Hampshire University

Sheehan, Elizabeth

Jowdy_Beth

Dr. Sheehan teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses. Her courses include: Introduction to Sport Management, Governance and Management of Sport Organizations, Sport Event Sponsorship, Sport Event Marketing & Management, Leadership and Sport Event Management. Specialty areas: experiential learning, reflection, integral theory, leadership and organizational development, and grassroots sport event management.

 

 

 

  The use of experiential activities and reflection as methods to enhance social and emotional learning is commonly accepted in higher education. It is believed that through experience-based courses students deepen and possibly alter presently held assumptions when classroom experiences allow students to practice skills and reflect on behaviors that simulate "real-world" situations. However, how is it that experience-based courses develop the emotional competencies necessary for students to effectively manage themselves and others in the workplace and in life? This study examines the impact of a sport event management course on students’ emotional competency. Specifically, this study answers the question: Can a semester-long experience-based course increase students’ emotional competency when students are not introduced to emotional intelligence theory. The book is addressed to faculty and academic administrators in higher education. Since a popular misconception associated with experiential learning is that the outcomes are subjective and difficult to measure, the results of this study will also be of interest to individuals involved with any form of experiential education.
Dec 012009
 

Source: Integral+Life

image Elliott Ingersoll is a Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Counseling, Administration, Supervision, and Adult Learning at Cleveland State University. He is licensed as a Professional Clinical Counselor and a psychologist in the state of Ohio.

Elliott Ingersoll is a Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Counseling, Administration, Supervision, and Adult Learning at Cleveland State University. He is licensed as a Professional Clinical Counselor and a psychologist in the state of Ohio.

Elliott has authored and co-authored four books, and two dozen articles and book chapters on topics ranging from Integral Theory to its infusion in counseling, spirituality, psychopharmacology, and diagnosis. Most recently, Elliott co-authored Psychopharmacology for Helping Professionals: An Integral Exploration (2005). He lives in Kent, Ohio with his wife Jennifer, son Brady, and newborn daughter Kaitlyn.

Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

Elliott Ingersoll’s books and journal publications focus on psychopharmacology, mental health treatment, and the role of spirituality in counseling and psychotherapy.

See also: www.elliottingersoll.com/ and elliottingersoll.gaia.com/ 

 

  This book provides a basic foundation that readers can use to draw practical and personal conclusions regarding the interface of counseling and spirituality. Readers will have a unique opportunity for both didactic and experiential investigation of spiritual and religious beliefs in relation to the counseling process. The authors provide important information on issues and concepts regarding spirituality, as well as examples of specific interventions related to the topics. The authors have made a conscious attempt to provide readers with information not addressed in other counseling and spirituality texts. The text is divided into three domains, the philosophical, the practical, and the personal. It is the authors’ premise that a holistic model of counseling and spirituality that integrates the scholarly and philosophical with the practical and personal must be used. This book provides a rich introduction to the topics, drawing on various disciplines, and presents the information in a user-friendly manner.
  “A wide range of practice-based topics are addressed in this fact-packed reference book for mental health professionals. Divided into nine major sections, it covers both practical and ethical concerns. The first section focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of common mental illnesses through the life cycle and includes issues relating to specific groups, crisis interventions, and practice management concerns. This is followed by discussions of legal/ethical issues and how mental health workers can cope with the formidable demands and stresses (e.g., compassion fatigue and burnout) of their occupations. The chapters are succinct, typically including statistics, current research, statements of the "best practice," and notable bibliographies. The editors, both professors of counseling at Cleveland State University, have done an admirable job of assembling into a coherent whole contributions from more than 70 experts from a variety of fields. The result is a wealth of useful information handily packaged for the working professional. The practical, direct, and authoritative tone of the book makes it suitable for a diverse audience needing a bridge between the divergent worlds of practice and multidisciplinary research in the field. Recommended for specialized collections serving mental healthcare providers.”
—Antoinette Brinkman, MLS, Evansville, IN (Library Journal, December 2001)
  Master the basics of psychopharmacology with PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY FOR HELPING PROFESSIONALS! Concise yet comprehensive, this counseling text covers the basic principles of psychopharmacology, commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs for adults, and psychotropic medications prescribed to children. Through the use of numerous case examples, study questions, bolded key terms, and glossary, understanding and applying the material has never been easier. Practical information about how to talk with clients about medication and compliance as well as hands-on information about how to approach collaboration with prescribing professionals prepares you to apply what you have learned to practice.
  This practical book offers valuable information, suggestions, and guidelines designed to help readers learn how to work effectively in an agency setting. The unifying theme and framework is the value and importance of looking at personal and professional aspects of agency counseling. This text helps the reader look inside themselves as well as outside of themselves at their agency.
Nov 302009
 

Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

Joanne Hunt, MA, MCC, is the Co-Founder of Integral Coaching Canada Inc. (Ottawa, Canada), the coaching partner of the Integral Institute and Integral Life. She is a Master Certified Coach with the International Coach Federation and has a Masters Degree in Management Studies. She co-developed the highly respected application of Integral Theory in the field of professional coaching. She is a Senior Teacher who trains, certifies and licenses Integral Coaching® professionals.

Source: Integral+Life

image Joanne is the Vice President of Integral Coaching and Development for Integral Life and the Co-Founder of Integral Coaching Canada.  She is a lead instructor for Integral Coaching Canada’s advanced programs, and students describe her as an expert coach, a playful human being and a passionate, skilled teacher. Rooted in her own commitment to living with personal integrity and authenticity, Joanne brings this dedication to how she teaches, how she guides faculty and how she coaches clients. Joanne brings fifteen years of direct experience in corporate leadership positions to her work with clients, and she is is known for her clear, direct and skillful attention to what people truly need as they build the competencies necessary to more fully manifest their lives.

Working for fifteen years in senior leadership positions in three multi-national corporations, it was Joanne’s exceptional ability to get to the ‘heart of the matter’ that enabled her to powerfully influence and lead change initiatives that ranged in scale from small groups to large-scale corporate programs. Not only able to envision and create, Joanne also has a unique capacity to cultivate deep commitment across diverse groups with ‘competing’ values and perspectives such that phenomenal results are attained. Coaching skills were always a part of her skill set as a corporate leader and Joanne produced significant results in improving business & individual effectiveness, leadership & change management implementation, strategic planning, and organizational restructuring while also nurturing the development of her teams.

Joanne holds a Masters Degree in Management Studies specializing in research and human resource development. Over the last two decades she has studied extensively with a variety of training institutes in fields such as coaching, systemic change, leadership development, and adult human development. Joanne has been working in the coaching profession for almost ten years and within this discipline has achieved the highest designation of Master Certified Coach by the International Coach Federation (ICF) while developing and co-founding the School of Integral Coaching® with her partner, Laura. She completed the Integral Institute’s inaugural offering of Integral Life Practice in 2004, attended the Integral Leadership Seminar in 2006 and is a long-time student of Integral Theory. Joanne is the Vice President of Integral Coaching and Development for Integral Life.

Joanne’s work also includes being a ‘Researcher & Writer’ for Integral Coaching Canada Inc. This role enables Joanne to pursue two passions that fuel her coaching work: R & D (especially on all things AQAL) and writing (articles, songs, poetry, Integral Coaching® material). These domains continue to support Integral Coaching Canada’s new curriculum designs, resource development and methodological advances which bring clarity and ongoing design innovation to the delivery and leading edge nature of the Integral Coaching® training programs.

Joanne is a lead instructor for Integral Coaching Canada’s advanced programs and students describe her as an expert coach, a playful human being and a passionate, skilled teacher. Rooted in her own commitment to living with personal integrity and authenticity, Joanne brings this dedication to how she teaches, how she guides faculty and how she coaches clients. Joanne is known for her clear, direct and skillful attention to what people truly need as they build the competencies necessary to more fully manifest their lives.

Deeply exploring various modalities for approaching change, Joanne also works with professional coaches to further enable the integration of their development through writing and meditative practice. Approaching writing from an AQAL perspective continues to support her development and the growth of those who work with her; she has a balanced set of Integral Life Practices that have supported her for many years. Last of all, Joanne has a unique and piercing way of bringing Integral Theory and practice to what’s real, what’s necessary and what’s relevant in the practical and messy day-to-day-ness of the fully-lived life of a coach or client.

See also: Integral Coaching Canada

Media Contributions

Integral Coaching The Flavors of Presence

Contributors: Joanne Hunt, Laura Divine and Ken Wilber

Integral Coaching The Many Ways We Grow

Contributors: Joanne Hunt, Laura Divine and Ken Wilber

 Integral Coaching

Contributors: Joanne Hunt, Laura Divine and Ken Wilber

 Integral Coaching Communicating Across Worlds

Contributors: Joanne Hunt, Laura Divine and Ken Wilber

 Integral Coaching: An Intimate Conversation

Contributors: Joanne Hunt and Huy Lam

 Integral Coaching Orientations

Contributors: Joanne Hunt, Laura Divine and Ken Wilber

Nov 302009
 

Source: Integral Institute – Scholars

Gail Hochachka, MA, is a contributor to Integral International Development studies, where she works to advance the theory and practice of an Integral approach to international development. She is also researching, writing, and building capacity on integral praxis to global wellbeing as Director of the non-profit organization Drishti Centre for Integral Action based in British Columbia. Recently, she joined the core faculty of John F. Kennedy’s School for Holistic Studies to teach in the Integral Psychology Masters Program.

Source: Integral Research Center

Gail Hochachka, MA is Adjunct Faculty at John F. Kennedy University. As the Program Director of the non-profit organization Drishti – Centre for Integral Action based in British Columbia, she is researching, writing, and building capacity on the use of an Integral Approach to address global issues, with current projects in Peru and El Salvador. She leads the Integral Field Courses for JFKU. She is the author of Developing Sustainability, Developing the Self: An Integral Approach to International and Community Development.

Source: Integral+Life

image Gail is the founder and director of the non-profit organization Drishti Centre for Integral Action based in BC, Canada. Drishti is a learning community for dialoguing and deepening understanding about integral praxis and also a platform for working with an Integral approach to global wellbeing.

Having lived and worked in many countries including El Salvador, Costa Rica, Peru, India, Australia, Nigeria, and Ethiopia, Gail recognizes that behind the enchanting diversity of this planet, there are also deeper patterns and processes that unite us. Her approach to working with the most material and physical of issues is not separated from the deeper, existential and developmental aspects of individuals and groups. It is in this profound union and integration that her intrigue in Integral Theory arises.

As Co-Director of Integral International Development Centre (IIDC), she is exploring the theory and practice of an Integral Approach to international development through research, training, networking, and projects. Her research focuses on how practitioners are engaging interior human development as an interwoven and essential aspect of sustainable development, and how Integral Theory can complement and deepen this existing work. This includes both integrally-informed organizations and practitioners, as well as "folk integral" approaches, which are not informed by Integral Theory per se, but include many of its elements in practice.

Gail is the founder and director of the non-profit organization Drishti Centre for Integral Action based in BC, Canada. Drishti is a learning community for dialoguing and deepening understanding about integral praxis and also a platform for working with an Integral approach to global wellbeing. Its team carries out research, writing, workshops, presentations, consulting, and capacity building on an Integral approach to community development, sustainability, international development, ecology, and leadership. One recent project included working with organizations in Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

Gail is also a practitioner of Ashtanga Yoga and student of Advaita Vedanta, which provide a transformative process for self-development and a source of inspiration for her work.

See also: Drishti – Centre for Integral Action

 

This book explores an Integral Approach to community and international development, integrating previous practices to move into new arenas of action and inquiry. It suggests that development involves personal, collective and systemic transformation, and to work in these three areas effectively requires a broader and deeper approach to developmentbroader in terms of including interior and exterior needs of humans, and deeper to more fully engage individual and collective transformation. The underlying premise is that all previous and current practices in development have important insights to offer the field. The task for today’s development practitioner is to honor these multiple truths, integrating their methodologies for a comprehensive, dynamic approach to addressing global issues.

The book is written for anyone involved in international development, community development, and/or social change in general. Included is an introduction to Integral Theory applied to the field of international development. The last half of the booklet provides an example of an Integral Approach in practice in El Salvador.

This is based on MA thesis fieldwork in San Juan del Gozo, El Salvador in collaboration with CESTA, POLIS Project on Ecological Governance, and Drishti-Centre for Integral Action, with financial support from Canada’s International Development Research Centre.